Notable Lifetimes of the Ascended Master, St Germain – Roger Bacon

St. Germain is an ascended master recognized for his work with alchemy and the performing of miracles. He is the lord or chohan of the seventh ray, the color violet and the seat-of-the-soul  2schakra. The ascended masters once walked the earth the same as we do. They had lifetimes in which they perfected various soul and character qualities. A study of specific lifetimes of the masters helps us to understand what is required for true self-mastery. One of the more well-known lifetimes of the ascended master St. Germain is that of Roger Bacon, a thirteenth century Franciscan Friar in England.

Roger Bacon was born in Somerset, England in 1214. His family appears to have been well-off, but during the stormy reign of Henry III of England, their property was abandoned and several members of the family were driven into exile. Bacon was engaged in academic and theological studies for decades. He became a Master at Oxford, lecturing on Aristotle. Sometime between 1237 and 1245, he began to lecture at the University of Paris, then the center of intellectual life in Europe. Eventually Bacon became a Friar in the Franciscan Order, and he no longer held a teaching post. After 1260, his activities were further restricted by a Franciscan statute forbi2dding Friars from publishing books or pamphlets without specific approval.

Bacon avoided this restriction through his friendship with Cardinal Guy le Gros de Foulques, who became Pope Clement IV. The new Pope issued a mandate ordering Bacon to write to him concerning the place of philosophy within theology. As a result, Bacon sent the Pope his Opus Majus, which presented his views on how the philosophy of Aristotle and science could be incorporated into a new theology. Roger Bacon also wrote other works on alchemy and astrology. Pope Clement died in 1268, and Bacon was later placed under house arrest by Jerome of Ascoli, the Minister-General of the Franciscan Order for his beliefs and writings.

During his lifetime, Roger Bacon had performed and described numerous experiments, which are viewed as the first instances of true experimental science, several hundred years before the official rise of science in the West. Bacon is remembered as a brilliant scholar, scientist and philosopher with the courage to stick to his beliefs whatever the cost.

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